Knee Arthroscopy

A knee arthroscopy is often referred to as “keyhole surgery”. Using an arthroscope and special instruments the inside of the knee is examined through two or rarely three small incisions around the knee.

Arthroscopy of the knee is quite commonly performed for dealing with meniscal tears. These are often diagnosed on a MRI scan.

Some meniscal tears are amenable to repair with suture anchors. If possible, a repair is always preferred over resection of the torn meniscus.

Unfortunately, the majority of meniscal tears require removal rather than repair.

Not all meniscal tears require arthroscopic intervention.

Knee arthroscopy and is performed with the patient sleep and most commonly, two small keyhole incisions are made to allow access of the arthroscope and instruments that may be required.

Knee arthroscopy and is performed with the patient sleep and most commonly, two small keyhole incisions are made to allow access of the arthroscope and instruments that may be required.

In very carefully selected patients with early degenerative disease of the knee, arthroscopy can give long lasting relief of arthritic symptoms and delay the requirement for more extensive surgery.

Knee arthroscopy is performed as a day case in the great majority of patients (i.e. the patient is discharged home on the same day as the surgery)